Sixty Hours with Mezzacorona

As I have mentioned a few times, I am currently in Italy as the result of a quick press trip sponsored by the makers of Mezzacorona and Rotari wines. While the trip itself was brief (only three days), it was not short on information about the wines and the region. There was also plenty of incredible food and numerous outbursts of laughter–without a doubt a great trip.

I will be publishing more about the trip soon, but here are just a few of the dozens of photos I took over the course of the three days.

DSC_0240 (1)

Lunch, shortly after landing in Verona and following a short drive to Lake Garda.

After a quick nap, we had apperitivo lakeside with Mezzacorona Rosé.

After a quick nap, we had aperitivo lakeside with Mezzacorona Rosé.

Sunset along Lake Garda.

Sunset along Lake Garda.

DSC_0266 (1)

Hotel Baia dei Pini.

The following day we drove up to the town of Mezzacorona and the winery that shares its name.

The following day we drove up to the town of Mezzacorona and the winery that shares its name.

We quickly drove up into the vineyards and inspected some Pinot Noir.

We quickly drove up into the vineyards and inspected some Pinot Noir.

The Dolomites provide unique soils and character to the wines.

The Dolomites provide unique soils and character to the wines.

The towns in the Adige Valley are brightly colored and adorable (I hate that word, but it is appropriate here!).

The towns in the Adige Valley are brightly colored and adorable (I hate that word, but it is appropriate here!).

Our first tasting in the vineyards (under la pergola Tentino) with a grower family and Mezzacorona winemaker Lucio Matricardi (center).

Our first tasting in the vineyards (under la pergola Tentino) with a grower family and Mezzacorona winemaker Lucio Matricardi (center).

Another vineyard stop, this time to inspect a 250 year old Teroldego vine.

Another vineyard stop, this time to inspect a 250-year-old Teroldego vine.

Teroldego grapes on the verge of harvest.

Teroldego grapes on the verge of harvest.

Drinking Teroldego Reserve with another of the 1,500 growers that make up the Mezzacorona cooperative.

Drinking Teroldego Rotalino Reserve with another of the 1,500 growers that make up the Mezzacorona cooperative.

Lunch was up in the mountains and included a lively discussion centered around Pinot Noir.

Lunch was up in the mountains and included a lively discussion centered around Pinot Noir.

The hotel that night was in Trento, and we were just a few steps away from the city's main square.

The hotel that night was in Trento, and we were just a few steps away from the city’s main square.

The following day, it was back to the winery, this time to visit Rotary and the sparkling wine production.

The following day, it was back to the winery, this time to visit Rotari and the sparkling wine production.

Rotary falls under the increasingly popular TrentoDOC, perhaps the finest region for sparkling wine production in Italy.

Rotari falls under the increasingly popular TrentoDOC, perhaps the finest region for sparkling wine production in Italy.

The impressive steel structure at Rotary from underneath.

The impressive steel structure at Rotari from underneath.

After a tour of the facility, Lucio opened a bottle of 1997 Rotari which had been resting on the lees for two decades. After a quick disgorgement à la volée, we had one of the more memorable sparklers I have tried in a while.

After a tour of the facility, Lucio opened a bottle of 1997 Rotari which had been resting on the lees for two decades. After a quick disgorgement à la volée, we had one of the more memorable sparklers I have tried in a while.

Lunch that day was at Lake Caldonazzo where Lucio and fellow writer Deborah Grossman hammed it up a bit.

Lunch that day was at Lake Caldonazzo where Lucio and fellow writer Deborah Grossman hammed it up a bit.

The Mezzacorona team (left to right): Giovanna, Lucio, Deanna, and Barbara.

The Mezzacorona team (left to right): Giovanna, Lucio, Deanna, and Barbara.

Dinner that night was in the winery, where we polished off a number of bottles.

Dinner that night was in the winery, where we polished off a number of bottles.

The entire crew (I am the non-short one).

The entire crew (I am the non-short one).

We had to eventually bid arrivederci to Rotary....

We had to eventually bid arrivederci to Rotari….

...and Mezzacorona, but Lucio invited us back any time.

…and Mezzacorona, but Lucio invited us back any time.

 

Advertisements

About the drunken cyclist

I have been an occasional cycling tour guide in Europe for the past 20 years, visiting most of the wine regions of France. Through this "job" I developed a love for wine and the stories that often accompany the pulling of a cork. I live in Philadelphia with my lovely wife and two wonderful sons.
This entry was posted in Italian Wine, Winery Visit. Bookmark the permalink.

14 Responses to Sixty Hours with Mezzacorona

  1. foxress says:

    These are some really great photos, Jeff. I’m looking forward to following you on this trip

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Thanks so much for taking the time to chronicle your trip! I always enjoy the opportunity to learn more about the world of wine and learning about Mezzacorona was a real treat!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Reblogged this on worldandwinegetaways and commented:
    Thought I would share a blog post about a winery that many of you I am sure have heard of:Mezzacorona. I am not very familiar with their wines, but thanks to the Drunken Cyclist, we now have a better perspective on the winery and its surrounding area. Enjoy!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. chef mimi says:

    Great photos. I still don’t understand how you got this gig. But bravo!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Jill Barth says:

    Just so you know, I came back to this post a second time to gaze. And be jealous. But mostly gaze…. ahhhh!

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s