Saturday Reminders—4/20/19

Today is a beautiful day in Houston as the forecast calls for sunny and high 70s. What makes even more special is that there is no Taekwondo, no baseball game, no anything that requires a parent to shuttle a kid across town, or sit and pray that something exciting happens that does not require a trip to the emergency room. Nope. Nothing going on at all. You have to love Easter weekend in the south. What does that mean for me? Sitting around, doing nothing until it warms up enough to go for a ride. Bliss. Before I start doing absolutely nothing, here are a few reminders:

  1. I am continuing to collect samples for my Third Annual Largest Blind Tasting of American True Rosés! A “True Rosé “ is a wine that was always intended to be a rosé—some people call them “intentional rosés”, “direct press rosés”, or even “bespoke rosé.” In other words, these are not saignées (a by-product of red wine production when part of the juice of a red wine is bled off [“saignée” means “bled” in French] and made into a rosé)This year I will again host the event at my house for several Houston based wine writers and bloggers in early May. Please let me know if you have a wine that should be included or if you may be interested in attending (although there is limited space). Last year we tried 68 (!) True Rosés! This year, I am trying to limit that number as my teeth hurt for three days after all of those rosés.
  2. I am also in the process of getting together a bike tour of Provence for early October. The tour will be centered around the town of Vaison-la-Romaine in Provence. Details are still being ironed out, but we will ride in the morning (with an optional climb up the infamous Mont Ventoux one of the days), visit wineries in the afternoon, and take in many of the area’s top attractions (Pont du Gard, Avignon, Les Baux de Provence, etc.). We will stay at the incredible La Baye des Anges, a renovated farmhouse in Vaison. Please send me an email (jeff (at) thedrunkencyclist (dot) com) if you would like more information.
  3. Today is the first full day of Passover and as such, here are my reviews of a couple of kosher wines. Not quite sure what a kosher wine is? I wrote about the process a couple of years ago, which I still find completely fascinating. Check out that post HERE.

2017 Teperberg Vision Dry White: Retail $13. 60% Sauvignon Blanc, 40% French Colombard. This weekend is the start of Passover, so even though I am not Jewish, I thought I would break out this Kosher wine in spirit. The Colombard adds tropical notes to this aromatic wine which pairs well with the mineral aspects and salinity. The palate is fruity initially, followed by that salinity and a fairly good finish. I am not sure if the Colombard is a good thing here, but in honor of Passover, I am rolling with it, taking responsibility for the fact that I have not had enough experience with the grape to be certain. Good to Very Good. 86-88 Points.

2016 Barkan Cabernet Sauvignon Galil Reserve: Retail $13. Another bottle I grabbed to honor the starting of Passover–even though I am a goy, I have participated in a fair share of seders, particularly back in my college days when my roommate was Jewish and I would head to his house during Passover. An inviting nose of dark berry fruit, a bit of spice and some noticeable oak (the wine spent 20 months in barrel). Decent fruit and nice acidity on the palate and the oak seems to be well integrated. It is not a highly complex wine, but it will certainly keep you happy while you contemplate whether trying the gefilte fish is a good idea. Very Good. 87-89 Points

That’s all I have today—have a great and safe Saturday!

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About the drunken cyclist

I have been an occasional cycling tour guide in Europe for the past 20 years, visiting most of the wine regions of France. Through this "job" I developed a love for wine and the stories that often accompany the pulling of a cork. I live in Houston with my lovely wife and two wonderful sons.
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